different between stab vs sab

stab

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: st?b, IPA(key): /stæb/
  • Hyphenation: stab
  • Rhymes: -æb

Etymology 1

First attested in Scottish English (compare Scots stob, stobbe, stabb (a pointed stick or stake; a thrust with a pointed weapon)), from Middle English stabbe (a stab), probably a variant of Middle English stob, stub, stubbe (pointed stick, stake, thorn, stub, stump), from Old Norse stobbi, stubbi, cognate with Old English stybb. Cognate with Middle Dutch stobbe.

Supposed by some to derive from Scottish Gaelic stob (to prick, to prod, to push, to thrust); supposed by others to be from a Scots word.

Noun

stab (plural stabs)

  1. An act of stabbing or thrusting with an object.
  2. A wound made by stabbing.
  3. Pain inflicted on a person's feelings.
  4. (informal) An attempt.
    I'll give this thankless task a stab.
  5. Criticism.
  6. (music) A single staccato chord that adds dramatic impact to a composition.
    a horn stab
  7. A bacterial culture made by inoculating a solid medium, such as gelatin, with the puncture of a needle or wire.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

stab (third-person singular simple present stabs, present participle stabbing, simple past and past participle stabbed)

  1. (transitive) To pierce or to wound (somebody) with a pointed tool or weapon, especially a knife or dagger.
  2. (transitive) To thrust in a stabbing motion.
  3. (intransitive) To recklessly hit with the tip of a pointed object, such as a weapon or finger (often used with at).
    • None shall dare / With shortened sword to stab in closer war.
  4. (intransitive) To cause a sharp, painful sensation (often used with at).
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To injure secretly or by malicious falsehood or slander.
  6. (transitive) To roughen a brick wall with a pick so as to hold plaster.
  7. (transitive) To pierce folded sheets, near their back edges, for the passage of thread or wire.
Derived terms
  • stabbee
  • stabber
Translations

References

  • stab in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • stab at OneLook Dictionary Search

Etymology 2

Clipping of stabilizer or stabiliser.

Noun

stab (plural stabs)

  1. (aviation, slang) The horizontal or vertical stabilizer of an aircraft.

Etymology 3

Adjective

stab (not comparable)

  1. (industrial relations) Clipping of established.
    • 1893, Proceedings of the Parliament of South Australia (page 313)
      Do you know whether any country offices pay their men by the thousand, or whether they are on stab wages? — I do not know. Some are paid stab wages, but I do not know whether there is much piece-work.
    • 1967, John Child, Industrial Relations in the British Printing Industry (page 113)
      The pressmen were granted a stab wage of 36s for a 60 hour week, and the extras for overtime and Sunday work []

Noun

stab (plural not attested)

  1. (industrial relations) Clipping of establishment.
    • 1892, The British Printer (volume 5, page 42)
      [] there were 286 overseers and 210 readers occupied in the 501 offices; 2,691 compositors were paid on the stab []

Anagrams

  • ABTs, ATBs, ATSB, Bast, Bats, SATB, TBAs, TBSA, Tabs, bast, bats, tabs

Danish

Etymology

From German Stab.

Noun

stab c (singular definite staben, plural indefinite stabe)

  1. staff

Inflection


Lushootseed

Etymology

Proto-Salish *s-tam ("what?"; "something"), from *s- +? *tam (thing; what)

Determiner

stab

  1. what (interrogative pronoun)
  2. thing

Swedish

Etymology

From German Stab.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /st??b/

Noun

stab c

  1. a staff

Declension

References

Anagrams

  • bast

stab From the web:

  • what stabilizes the knee on the posterior side
  • what stabilizes blood sugar
  • what stable means
  • what stabilizes whipped cream
  • what stabilizes the cell membrane
  • what stability means
  • what stable is hestu at
  • what stabilizes dna during replication


sab

English

Etymology

Short for sabotage.

Verb

sab (third-person singular simple present sabs, present participle sabbing, simple past and past participle sabbed)

  1. (informal) To sabotage, especially fox hunts in opposition to blood sports.

Noun

sab (plural sabs)

  1. (informal) A saboteur, especially of fox hunts.

Anagrams

  • ABS, ABs, Abs, B. A. S., B.A.S., B.A.s, BAS, BAs, BSA, SBA, abs, abs-, abs., bas

Catalan

Verb

sab

  1. Obsolete form of sap.

Cornish

Noun

sab f (singulative saben)

  1. pines

Synonyms

  • pin

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French sable (sand)

Noun

sab

  1. sand

Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic ???????? (?a??ba). Compare Moroccan Arabic ???? (??b).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sa?p/

Verb

sab (imperfect jsib, past participle misjub)

  1. to find
    1. to find (something) useful
  2. to catch
  3. to look for
  4. to find out, to realise

Conjugation


Scots

Noun

sab (plural sabs)

  1. sob

Verb

sab

  1. sob

sab From the web:

  • what sabbath means
  • what sabbath is today
  • what sabbath
  • what sabra hummus was recalled
  • what sabbatical mean
  • what sabrina character are you
  • what sabotage
  • what sab means
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