different between spag vs spang

spag

English

Etymology

Clipping of spaghetti.

Noun

spag (uncountable)

  1. (informal) spaghetti

Related terms

  • spag bol

Anagrams

  • A-GPS, AGPs, GPAs, PASG, gaps, gasp

Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [spa?]

Noun

spag (nominative plural spags)

  1. spark

Declension

spag From the web:

  • what spaghetti
  • what spaghetti sauce is keto friendly
  • what spaghetti sauce is gluten free
  • what spaghetti sauce has no sugar
  • what spaghetti sauce has no chunks
  • what spaghetti sauce is vegan
  • what spaghetti is good for diabetics
  • what spaghetti sauce has no onions


spang

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spæ?/
  • Rhymes: -æ?

Etymology 1

From Middle English spang (a small piece of ornamental metal; spangle; small ornament; a bowl or cup), likely from Middle Dutch spange (buckle, clasp) or Old English spang (buckle, clasp).

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

spang (plural spangs)

  1. (obsolete) A shiny ornament or object; a spangle

Derived terms

  • spangle

Verb

spang (third-person singular simple present spangs, present participle spanging, simple past and past participle spanged)

  1. To set with bright points: star or spangle.
  2. To hitch; fasten.

Etymology 2

Onomatopoeic.

Verb

spang (third-person singular simple present spangs, present participle spanging, simple past and past participle spanged)

  1. (intransitive, of a flying object such as a bullet) To strike or ricochet with a loud report
    • 1918, Zane Grey, The U.P. Trail
      How clear, sweet, spanging the hammer blows!

Adverb

spang (not comparable)

  1. (dated) Suddenly; slap, smack.
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, p. 22:
      And I didn't stop until I found myself spang in the middle of the Musée de Cluny, clutching the rack.

Etymology 3

Probably from spring (verb) or spank (verb) (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

Verb

spang (third-person singular simple present spangs, present participle spanging, simple past and past participle spanged)

  1. (intransitive, dialect, Britain, Scotland) To leap; spring.
    • a. 1758, Allan Ramsay, epistle to Robert Yarde
      But when they spang o'er reason's fence, / We smart for't at our own expense.
  2. (transitive, dialect, Britain, Scotland) To cause to spring; set forcibly in motion; throw with violence.

Noun

spang (plural spangs)

  1. (Scotland) A bound or spring; a leap.

Etymology 4

See span

Noun

spang (plural spangs)

  1. (Scotland) A span.

References

  • spang in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • spang in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Pangs, pangs

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse sp?ng, cf. Swedish spång. See also German Spange (clasp). Probably related to span from Proto-Germanic *spannan?.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sp????], [sp????] (example of pronunciation)
    Rhymes: -á??

Noun

spang f (definite singular spanga, plural spinger, definite plural spingren)

  1. a simple one-man bridge, log bridge, footbridge

References

spang From the web:

  • what spangled means
  • what pangea
  • what pangea looked like
  • what pangender
  • what pangolins eat
  • what pangaea
  • what pangea mean
  • what language did jesus speak
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