different between saddle vs buckjumping

saddle

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?sæd?l/, [?sædl?]
  • Rhymes: -æd?l

Etymology 1

From Middle English sadel, from Old English sadol, from Proto-Germanic *sadulaz, from Proto-Indo-European *sod-d?lo-, from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (to sit) + *-d?lom (instrumental suffix). Cognate with Scots sadil, Saterland Frisian Soadel, West Frisian seal, Dutch zadel, Low German Sadel, German Sattel, Danish sadel, Swedish sadel, Icelandic söðull, Russian ?????? (sedló).

Noun

saddle (plural saddles)

  1. A seat (tack) for a rider placed on the back of a horse or other animal.
  2. An item of harness (harness saddle) placed on the back of a horse or other animal.
  3. A seat on a bicycle, motorcycle, etc.
  4. A cut of meat that includes both loins and part of the backbone.
    • 1870, The Cook and Housewife's Manual (5th edition)
      A modern refinement is to put laver in the dripping-pan, which, in basting, imparts a high gout: or a large saddle may be served over a pound and a half of laver, stewed in brown sauce with catsup []
  5. A low point, in the shape of a saddle, between two hills.
    • 1977, John Le Carré, The Honourable Schoolboy, Folio Society 2010, p. 483:
      With Lizzie leading, they scrambled quickly over several false peaks towards the saddle.
  6. (mining) A formation of gold-bearing quartz occurring along the crest of an anticlinal fold, especially in Australia.
  7. The raised floorboard in a doorway.
  8. (construction) A small tapered or sloped area structure that helps channel surface water to drains.
  9. (nautical) A block of wood, usually fastened to one spar and shaped to receive the end of another.
  10. (engineering) A part, such as a flange, which is hollowed out to fit upon a convex surface and serve as a means of attachment or support.
  11. The clitellum of an earthworm.
  12. Any of the saddle-like markings on a boa constrictor.
  13. A saddle shoe.
    • 1972, Judy Blume, Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing (page 56)
      'Brown-and-white saddles for Fudge and loafers for Peter.'
      'OK, Peter... let's see how those feet have grown.'
      I slipped out of my old shoes and stood up.
  14. (music, lutherie) That part of a guitar which supports the strings and, in an acoustic guitar, transfers their vibrations via the bridge to the soundboard.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English sadelen, from Old English sadolian, from Proto-Germanic *sadul?n?.

Verb

saddle (third-person singular simple present saddles, present participle saddling, simple past and past participle saddled)

  1. (transitive) To put a saddle on (an animal).
  2. To get into a saddle.
  3. (transitive) To burden or encumber.
Translations

See also

  • sidle

Descendants

  • ? Japanese: ??? (sadoru)

References

  • “saddle”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Anagrams

  • addles, daleds

saddle From the web:

  • what saddle size do i need
  • what saddle for triceratops ark
  • what saddle is best for trail riding
  • what saddle pad should i use
  • what saddles do the pros use
  • what saddles do endurance riders use
  • what saddle width do i need
  • what saddles do ravagers use


buckjumping

English

Etymology

buck +? jumping

Pronunciation

Noun

buckjumping (uncountable)

  1. (of a horse) The action of aggressively attempting to buck a rider.
    • 1863, William Chambers, Robert Chambers, Chamber's Journal of Popular Literature, Science and Arts, page 299,
      But, after a little preliminary buckjumping, Pyrrhus falsified his keeper?s prediction by behaving well and obediently.
  2. (Australia) A rodeo event in which the rider attempts to stay in the saddle of a bucking horse for a set period.
    • 1893, Ernest Favenc, Tales of the Austral Tropics, Gutenberg Australia eBook #0600691h,
      “How well you ride, Mr. McIntyre!” said Miss Webster in the course of the dinner. “I must confess I like to see a bit of good buckjumping.”
      Duncan smiled. “I nearly came to grief under that low brigalow though,” he said.

buckjumping From the web:

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